Poem: Cloud and Ink | Nube y Tinta

Title: Cloud and Ink | Nube y Tinta

Language: Translation | Spanish to English

Category: Fantasy

Plot: A dove searches for the mortal who will become immortal and a god. When found, he will take a cloud as a pen and a tear as ink so that he can paint a woman’s face –possibly yours– on the meadow and sea.


Featured Verses:

Tear as ink and

with his hand paint

your face on the meadow and

your hair on the sea.

Original Verses: (Spanish)

Lágrima por tinta y

con su mano pintar

tu pinta en el prado y

tu cabello en el mar.


Poet’s Comments: One of my favorite approaches to writing poetry is allowing the poem as much plot as a poem can have. In this, I’m influenced by the classics. From time to time, I enjoy merging reality and fantasy without flinching.

Where to find the poems…

The translated poem in English:

CoverCaribbeanPoetAA
Caribbean Poet (Release: June 1, 2017)

The original poem in Spanish:

Poemas_Caribeos_Cover_for_Kindle
Poemas Caribeños (available)
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The Poetic Story Of Princess Taína & Prince Connell’s Wild Atlantic Love

The Poetic Story Of Princess Taína

&

Prince Connell’s Wild Atlantic Love

by Luis S. González-Acevedo


Note: After the poem, you’ll find an Explanation of Terms. The explanations will enhance your understanding of The Poetic Story Of Princess Taína & Prince Connell’s Wild Atlantic Love. I recommend you read the Explanation of Terms first.


I

Cross the Emerald Isle once more,
my Corracloona Prince and Leitrim Lord.
Easterlies will sail you –Connell– to her river’s ford.
But first, wage your loving war against the ocean’s roars,
that you may proudly disembark upon her island’s shores.
Thrust through the winding paths of Rich Port’s forest
as Taína’s prickling rains drown your Irish soul in peaceful rest
and guide you toward the island’s tropic center.
There, you’ll be compelled to render
your heart by love distressed.


II

Near Written Rock, Princess Taína splashes waters round her body by the river’s bank.
When you see her, –like the poet about Innisfree– this whisper from your lips will pour:
“I hear it in the deep heart’s core,”
where her image leaves an everlasting brand
as her eyes foreshadow the Puerto Rican poet’s chant
about the world illuminating with the memory of her gaze.
Princess of your lustful Hell, she’ll set your soul ablaze.
Interlocking eyes aflame will set as seals upon your hearts
–even if your cherished love is severed wide, oceans apart
and even after your demise at Prince Connell’s Grave.


III

As with all in life, my prince, the call for your departure shall arrive.
Toward Éire you’ll sail again against the ocean’s torture –its Wild Atlantic Way.
Westerlies will take you back toward Kiltyclogher’s sway
where day by day you’ll cry: Without her love, how am I to survive?
and she’ll proclaim: You’re mine, Connell. How shall I stay alive?
Today, the rains of Ireland are Connell’s ghostly tears;
and Caribbean hurricanes embody Taína’s torment in her lonely years.
The princess sculpted petroglyphs of love & lust on Cacique Hayuya’s rock
as she daydreamed of MacNean Upper –his island nation’s lough.
But with the passing of time came her greatest fear…


IV

Surrounded by the Emerald’s ancient forest,
on a hill overlooking fields and meadows,
your dying breath, fainting eyes and longing sorrows
will be soothed by magic stones singing megalithic echoes from the cleft
where your immemorial past will rest.
Taína’s soul will crest upon Poseidon’s wave.
The Caribbean princess shall ride the ocean’s waters brave.
In lust for you…
In love with you…
In search of her Prince Connell’s Grave.


V

The niche for the royal dead she’ll find.
True lovers’ fate will be Taína’s guide,
reversing what was severed by the sea’s divide.
You –from the ropes of death, the princess shall unbind
and your spirit she’ll rewind
back into her loving light,
both your souls afloat in flight
like reunited fluttering doves
for which eternity can never be enough,
entranced in Rich Port & Éire’s delight.


Explanation of Terms

Emerald Isle: a reference to Ireland.
Corracloona: a townland in County Leitrim, Ireland.
Kiltyclogher: a small village in County Leitrim, Ireland.
Leitrim: County Leitrim, Ireland.
Connell or Prince Connell: a reference to Prince Connell (from Irish legend). In this poem, he is fictionally buried in Prince Connell’s Grave.
Prince Connell’s Grave: a megalithic structure or monument in Corracloona, near Kiltyclogher. In this poetic fiction, Prince Connell is buried here.
Easterlies: winds traveling from east to west.
Westerlies: winds traveling from west to east.
Rich Port: a reference to the Caribbean island of Puerto Rico.
Taínos: the native people of Puerto Rico.
Written Rock: a reference to a large rock with petroglyphs inscribed by the Taínos in the municipality of Jayuya, Puerto Rico. The locals call it “La Piedra Escrita.”
“Cacique Hayuya’s rock”: a reference to the historical Taíno chief of the region known today as Jayuya, Puerto Rico. “Rock” is a reference to Written Rock.
Taína or Princess Taína: a fictional character whose name is derived from the native Taínos. In this poem, she is the fictional daughter of Cacique Hayuya.
“the poet about Innisfree”: a reference to Irish poet William Butler Yeats and his poem The Lake Isle of Innisfree. The last verse of his poem is quoted.
“Puerto Rican poet’s chant”: a reference to Puerto Rican poet José P.H. Hernández and his poem Ojos Astrales.
Éire: Ireland
Wild Atlantic Way: a scenic journey through Ireland’s west coast.
MacNean Upper: an Irish lake shared by the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.
Megalithic: relating to very large stones in ancient cultures.
Poseidon: the Greek god of the sea.


from…

CoverCaribbeanPoetAA
Caribbean Poet (Release: June 1, 2017)

Poetry in Translation: Astral Eyes | Ojos Astrales

While at the Universidad de Puerto Rico, I ran across one of the most touching and romantic poems I’ve ever read. It was written by Puerto Rican poet José P.H. Hernández (1892-1922). I’d like to share his poem. I’ll also share my translated & modified version.


Ojos Astrales

by José P.H. Hernández

Si Dios un día
cegara toda fuente de luz,
el universo se alumbraría
con esos ojos que tienes tú.
Pero si –lleno de agrios enojos
por tal blasfemia– tus lindos ojos
Dios te arrancase,
para que el mundo con la alborada
de tus pupilas no se alumbrase;
aunque quisiera Dios no podría
tender la Noche sobre la Nada. . . .
¡porque aún el mundo se alumbraría
con el recuerdo de tu mirada!


Here is my translation/modification of Ojos Astrales:

Astral Eyes

by José P.H. Hernández
translation/modification by Luis S. González-Acevedo

If one day
God blinds all fountains of light,
the universe would illuminate
with the beauty in your eyes.
But if –full of sour anger
for such blasphemy– your eyes’ radiance
God nullifies,
so that the world with the daybreak
of your eyes doesn’t shine;
even if God wanted, he could not lay
the night over Nothing or eyes more divine…
Because the world would still shine
with the memory of the beauty in your eyes!

The Poetic Story Of Princess Taína & Prince Connell’s Wild Atlantic Love

The Poetic Story Of Princess Taína

&

Prince Connell’s Wild Atlantic Love

by Luis S. González-Acevedo


Note: After the poem, you’ll find an Explanation of Terms. The explanations will enhance your understanding of The Poetic Story Of Princess Taína & Prince Connell’s Wild Atlantic Love. I recommend you read the Explanation of Terms first.


I

Cross the Emerald Isle once more,
my Corracloona Prince and Leitrim Lord.
Easterlies will sail you –Connell– to her river’s ford.
But first, wage your loving war against the ocean’s roars,
that you may proudly disembark upon her island’s shores.
Thrust through the winding paths of Rich Port’s forest
as Taína’s prickling rains drown your Irish soul in peaceful rest
and guide you toward the island’s tropic center.
There, you’ll be compelled to render
your heart by love distressed.


II

Near Written Rock, Princess Taína splashes waters round her body by the river’s bank.
When you see her, –like the poet about Innisfree– this whisper from your lips will pour:
“I hear it in the deep heart’s core,”
where her image leaves an everlasting brand
as her eyes foreshadow the Puerto Rican poet’s chant
about the world illuminating with the memory of her gaze.
Princess of your lustful Hell, she’ll set your soul ablaze.
Interlocking eyes aflame will set as seals upon your hearts
–even if your cherished love is severed wide, oceans apart
and even after your demise at Prince Connell’s Grave.


III

As with all in life, my prince, the call for your departure shall arrive.
Toward Éire you’ll sail again against the ocean’s torture –its Wild Atlantic Way.
Westerlies will take you back toward Kiltyclogher’s sway
where day by day you’ll cry: Without her love, how am I to survive?
and she’ll proclaim: You’re mine, Connell. How shall I stay alive?
Today, the rains of Ireland are Connell’s ghostly tears;
and Caribbean hurricanes embody Taína’s torment in her lonely years.
The princess sculpted petroglyphs of love & lust on Cacique Hayuya’s rock
as she daydreamed of MacNean Upper –his island nation’s lough.
But with the passing of time came her greatest fear…


IV

Surrounded by the Emerald’s ancient forest,
on a hill overlooking fields and meadows,
your dying breath, fainting eyes and longing sorrows
will be soothed by magic stones singing megalithic echoes from the cleft
where your immemorial past will rest.
Taína’s soul will crest upon Poseidon’s wave.
The Caribbean princess shall ride the ocean’s waters brave.
In lust for you…
In love with you…
In search of her Prince Connell’s Grave.


V

The niche for the royal dead she’ll find.
True lovers’ fate will be Taína’s guide,
reversing what was severed by the sea’s divide.
You –from the ropes of death, the princess shall unbind
and your spirit she’ll rewind
back into her loving light,
both your souls afloat in flight
like reunited fluttering doves
for which eternity can never be enough,
entranced in Rich Port & Éire’s delight.


Explanation of Terms

Emerald Isle: a reference to Ireland.
Corracloona: a townland in County Leitrim, Ireland.
Kiltyclogher: a small village in County Leitrim, Ireland.
Leitrim: County Leitrim, Ireland.
Connell or Prince Connell: a reference to Prince Connell (from Irish legend). In this poem, he is fictionally buried in Prince Connell’s Grave.
Prince Connell’s Grave: a megalithic structure or monument in Corracloona, near Kiltyclogher. In this poetic fiction, Prince Connell is buried here.
Easterlies: winds traveling from east to west.
Westerlies: winds traveling from west to east.
Rich Port: a reference to the Caribbean island of Puerto Rico.
Taínos: the native people of Puerto Rico.
Written Rock: a reference to a large rock with petroglyphs inscribed by the Taínos in the municipality of Jayuya, Puerto Rico. The locals call it “La Piedra Escrita.”
“Cacique Hayuya’s rock”: a reference to the historical Taíno chief of the region known today as Jayuya, Puerto Rico. “Rock” is a reference to Written Rock.
Taína or Princess Taína: a fictional character whose name is derived from the native Taínos. In this poem, she is the fictional daughter of Cacique Hayuya.
“the poet about Innisfree”: a reference to Irish poet William Butler Yeats and his poem The Lake Isle of Innisfree. The last verse of his poem is quoted.
“Puerto Rican poet’s chant”: a reference to Puerto Rican poet José P.H. Hernández and his poem Ojos Astrales.
Éire: Ireland
Wild Atlantic Way: a scenic journey through Ireland’s west coast.
MacNean Upper: an Irish lake shared by the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.
Megalithic: relating to very large stones in ancient cultures.
Poseidon: the Greek god of the sea.


from…

CoverCaribbeanPoetAA
Caribbean Poet (Release: June 1, 2017)