a poem | May we have a home?

I dedicate this poem to those who have been denied a home because of race or ethnicity.

May we have a home?

The immigrants stood at their prospective landlord’s door in latent panic,
their only way to beg for an apartment
and secure their children’s smooth adjustment;
but they weren’t Anglo nor Germanic.
The couple was persistent. Caribbean Hispanics
battered by their circumstances and haggard
–yet intent on flying skyward.
But in the end, their mobile souls bled
when the soulless landlord said:
“I’m sorry, but you’re not the right Hispanic. –You know, European… Spaniards.”


May we have a home? is featured in Réquiem, by Luis S. González-Acevedo
The poem is also featured in Caribbean Poet, by Luis S. González-Acevedo


a poem | “Don’t spic English, I”

I dedicate this poem to those who without knowing a language have had to speak it...

“Don’t spic English, I”

Father told me, “Tell them…”
“I don’t speak English,”
because I understood the world in Spanish.
On a school day and acutely shy –ahem, ahem…
Reinventing grammar, I told them:
“Don’t speak English, I.”
The sentence was only close to right.
I could have died!
But like an outsider who would NOT be defeated,
my courageous little mouth and lips repeated:
“Jes! Don’t spic English, I.”


“Don’t spic English, I” is featured in Réquiem, by Luis S. González-Acevedo
The poem is also featured in Caribbean Poet, by Luis S. González-Acevedo

a poem | my childhood island fades


I dedicate this poem to those who have left their homeland

My Childhood Island Fades

Palm trees fade away…
Royal branches swaying disappear
as my youthful Caribbean fear
increases –anguish that a growing distance won’t allay.
Heart of Mine wish upon a star for me to stay
or in the future runaway back to my island’s shores.
Over sands, I’ll wade among its waves once more:
Seduced by seafoam’s wet caress
and kissed by the Atlantic’s breath
with winds that bind my ever-present soul ashore.


My Childhood Island Fades is featured in Réquiem, by Luis S. González-Acevedo

The poem is also featured in Caribbean Poet, by Luis S. González-Acevedo