Poem… u.s. president 45’s racist math

u.s. president 45’s racist math

–september 17, 2018–
columbus, ohio, usa

by Luis S. González-Acevedo

“3000 people did not die,”
tweets mr. Racist Bigot.
this monster’s hatred is so sly
entrenched in evil, he pivots.

only “6 to 18 deaths”
3000 deaths??? no way!!!
tweets 45 out of 45
not #1 out of 45
but dead last out of 45:
the devil’s friendship, he won’t betray.

how many puerto ricans make one human?
consider president 45’s racist math:
“166.6” –tweets the liar, his lie as gargantuan as lake huron
(a party enjoys his waters & jet skis on his water paths)

“when 498,000 puerto ricans have died,
only then 3000 humans have passed.” –u.s. president 45

let’s see if the Fool is as arrogant when he’s tried!


u.s. president 45’s racist math will appear in a future book of poems and stories (release date | July 2020)–



 

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Poem… virus (english | inglés)

virus

–august 6, 2018–
london, england

by Luis S. González-Acevedo

¡dare! invade my body
as you wager… ¡go ahead!
¡celebrate! ¡believe your folly!
that you can win if i’m left dead.

what you don’t know
is what i know from experience:
after your sickening blow
you’ll weaken in futile resistance.

but even if you win
your joy will be ephemeral
and life much like the wind.
in sum, my body is your coffin
and with my funeral
yours begins.


virus will appear in a future book of poems and stories (release date | July 2020)–



 

Poem… Potency

Potency

(translation|modification of Potencia)

by Luis S. González-Acevedo

Love, powerful giant
torrential strike of rivers
compared to death
if cold feelings exist.

Love destroys…
Explosive! Dynamite!
It strikes and runs;
and from a distance, mocks and yells.

Love can be defeated
and buried as dead.
Live, Great Pulse!
Sentiment, please stay!


–You can find the poem in Caribbean Poet, by Luis S. González-Acevedo or the original version in Spanish in Poemas Caribeños, por Luis S. González-Acevedo–



 

Poem… The Poet’s Destiny

The Poet’s Destiny

(translation|modification of Destino del Poeta)

by Luis S. González-Acevedo

Who will impose silence on a poet’s lips?
Who can go to war without weapons?
The words of a poet: beneficial arrows.
Villainous weapons: terrify the planet.

My rhymes water our cold human garden.
They are the sun’s tears. Impotent, the day breaks crying;
while in its obvious defiance, the tenebrous human night
covers its ears with severe winds to drown my song.

Poets die pronouncing eternal words.
Vicious time makes us suffer austere deaths.
It’s a curse that lasts a million serene nights;
but like Lazarus, every poet awaits the voice that proclaims: “Poet, come forth.”


–You can find the poem in Caribbean Poet, by Luis S. González-Acevedo or the original version in Spanish in Poemas Caribeños, por Luis S. González-Acevedo–



 

Poem… Dew

Dew

(translation|modification of Sereno)

by Luis S. González-Acevedo

Your affections are children of the night
whose father dies at sunset;
errant, with no one to reproach
their conduct in realms wet with dew.

Dew covers the face of its nocturnal reach
like a bloodhound covers terrain;
waiting for a flower to fall in a serene trance,
vital symptom of its nocturnal venom.

During daylight, the sun evaporates the waters,
letting them enter the celestial environment.
The nocturnal protector reincorporates them
into late sprinklings, nascent dew.

Darkness shelters the liquid substance
that at dawn covers a portion of the planet:
profit for gardens, fields and floras;
but for the night, a sign of its terrible death.

Night’s death is day’s birth.
Dawn participates in the astral encounter.
Sunset awaits rebelliously,
intending to once again unleash its dew.

Delightful Dew:
with your lustful frock just dying to shelter
an abandoned female
who will love you and let herself be loved by you.

The sun submerges in waters,
the moon springs up from the sea,
and Dew opens the doors
to bedrooms of roses lusting for love.


–You can find the poem in Caribbean Poet, by Luis S. González-Acevedo or the original version in Spanish in Poemas Caribeños, por Luis S. González-Acevedo–