Poem… Blue and Stolen Sky

Blue and Stolen Sky

(translation|modification of Cielo Azul Hurtado)

by Luis S. González-Acevedo

Over mountains in my native land,
eagles soar higher than the moon.
With grace, Agüeybaná intends to reach
his right to freedom and fortune.

Against the plains of my native land,
subjugated lizards drag their bellies.
Their cries are prayers
under the blue and stolen sky.

People under the blue and stolen sky,
where eagles fly over the moon
and lizards moan with enslaved weeping:
Choose freedom and its fortune!


–You can find the poem in Caribbean Poet, by Luis S. González-Acevedo or the original version in Spanish in Poemas Caribeños, por Luis S. González-Acevedo–



 

Poem… Skin of Blood

Skin of Blood

(translation|modification of Piel de Sangre)

by Luis S. González-Acevedo

Owner of the Caribbean, where are your dreams?
Little Caribbean native, what do you inherit from your parents?
The skin color stained across your chest
that an eternal Golden Century turns to blood.

Taíno boy, where is your mother?
I seek in vain the man you call father.
The boy answers: “Both will arrive very late,
when the native red of their hands turns to blood.”

You were a boy; you’re now a man –you confuse me.
Tears and sweat fall from your cheeks.
Do you sweat as you cry like the strong? Or…
Do you cry as you sweat, empowering the villainous traitors?

Caribbean native, break your chains and be free!
I invite you to the land that’s always yours;
its clouds lick blood from your body:
Paradise of Cacique Hayuya.

A paradise that wipes away all tears
and channels them into a crystal brook.
The celestial king kisses them with his rays and transports them
to a place that’s not a place –deadly for tears.


–You can find the poem in Caribbean Poet, by Luis S. González-Acevedo or the original version in Spanish in Poemas Caribeños, por Luis S. González-Acevedo–


Poem… Legend of the Coquí


Legend of the Coquí

(translation|modification of Leyenda del Coquí)

by Luis S. González-Acevedo

Waters slither…
Eternal murmur of rivers
Be silent for a moment
Allow the perpetual expression
That will never quiet
The voice of a native
Injured in solitary suffering.

His word is a cry
Pain paralyzes his tongue
With his finger wrapped in flames
On a rock, he writes a testament
And signs with tears –Coabey.

Foolish intellectuals
The enigma on the rock
You’ve not deciphered:
My testament…
Inheritance of eternal weeping
Fixed in blood
Over the heart –mine.

In the profound nocturnal darkness
An arrow kisses my chest and grazes my soul.
Moribund and pierced, I stagger toward you:
River of patriotic waters, share your life!
Lick my wounds.
Even if my body dies
Far be it from my Name to die.

Only glimmers of life remain.
With my hands in the wound
I tear flesh & bone… Blood flows.

I rip out my trapped heart and surrender it to you
With my blood and soul in tears.

As my heart falls into your crystalline waters…
As my blood and tears drown in you…
Take them to the confines of our homeland
As they touch the souls of other natives
Sleeping in your riverbed
Transform them into Coquís…
Coquí… Coquí…

The little angels sing Coquí…
Anachronistic echo of Tears
Blood, Souls & Heartbeats.


–You can find the poem in Caribbean Poet, by Luis S. González-Acevedo or the original version in Spanish in Poemas Caribeños, por Luis. S. González-Acevedo–


 

Poem: Skin of Blood

Poem: Skin of Blood (translation of Piel de Sangre)

Selected Verses:

Skin of Blood

(translation of Piel de Sangre)
by Luis S. González-Acevedo

Owner of the Caribbean, where are your dreams?
Little Caribbean native, what do you inherit
from your parents?
The skin color stained across your chest
that an eternal Golden Century turns to blood…

…Caribbean native, break your chains and be free!
I invite you to the land that’s always yours;
its clouds lick blood from your body:
Paradise of Cacique Hayuya.

A paradise that wipes away all tears
and channels them into a crystal brook.
The celestial king kisses them with his rays and transports them
to a place that’s not a place –deadly for tears.

 

Find the complete poem @…

and the original in Spanish @…