Poem… moribund crab

red crab
Photo by rompalli harish on Pexels.com

moribund crab

–november 16, 2019–
springfield, ohio

by Luis S. González-Acevedo

out of sight while hiding out
under sunken rocks
on beds of drab
the moribund crab
that i am and mock,
the world must learn to live without
water-clad round my crustaceous slab
forget me not
forget me stat

moribund crab will appear in a future book of poems and stories (release date | July 2020)–


 

Poem… ¿what inspires me?

¿what inspires me?

–december 31, 2018–
méxico city, méxico

by Luis S. González-Acevedo

island mountains against my small existence
a palm tree’s sensual sway
and the atlantic nights that drown my arrogance
caribbean breezes hissing through banana leaves their say
and the nostalgia of their vital scent from far away
the scorching sun against my skin over warm sands
while sea waves season me with foam and salt
and the way guava ignites the ocean’s salivary glands
the little frogs’ shrill song followed by their indiscretions
the moon’s kiss of rum and sugarcane
and night’s surrender to coffee passions:
the sweet and bitter darkness that humid skies can’t tame

¿what inspires me? will appear in a future book of poems and stories (release date | July 2020)–


Poem… Dew

Dew

(translation|modification of Sereno)

by Luis S. González-Acevedo

Your affections are children of the night
whose father dies at sunset;
errant, with no one to reproach
their conduct in realms wet with dew.

Dew covers the face of its nocturnal reach
like a bloodhound covers terrain;
waiting for a flower to fall in a serene trance,
vital symptom of its nocturnal venom.

During daylight, the sun evaporates the waters,
letting them enter the celestial environment.
The nocturnal protector reincorporates them
into late sprinklings, nascent dew.

Darkness shelters the liquid substance
that at dawn covers a portion of the planet:
profit for gardens, fields and floras;
but for the night, a sign of its terrible death.

Night’s death is day’s birth.
Dawn participates in the astral encounter.
Sunset awaits rebelliously,
intending to once again unleash its dew.

Delightful Dew:
with your lustful frock just dying to shelter
an abandoned female
who will love you and let herself be loved by you.

The sun submerges in waters,
the moon springs up from the sea,
and Dew opens the doors
to bedrooms of roses lusting for love.


–You can find the poem in Caribbean Poet, by Luis S. González-Acevedo or the original version in Spanish in Poemas Caribeños, por Luis S. González-Acevedo–



 

Poem… Mystical World of Hayuya

Mystical World of Hayuya

(translation|modification of Mundo Místico de Hayuya)

by Luis S. González-Acevedo

I hope to take you to another world,
enveloped and drowned in haze;
and immerse you in the deep
of its sky and sea of foam.

It’s a land of enchantment:
where winged sheep fly
and serpents provoke no fears.
Under a splendorous star,

the realm will possess you fondly.
The subsky is strawberry,
clouds dress with cotton,
and every day is a surprise.

In its center, a town sleeps.
Mountains surround it.
With its eyes, it wants to see me
and hold you in its heart.

¡Come! Abandon this foreign land
that you can’t call yours.
I’ll be El Cid and you… My Queen
Our empire… Green-Hayuya


–You can find the poem in Caribbean Poet, by Luis S. González-Acevedo or the original version in Spanish in Poemas Caribeños, por Luis S. González-Acevedo–



 

Poem (10 of 12)… To Bed Without Gothic Jill

GothUmbrella
Copyright | Alexei Zatsepin @ 123rf.com

To Bed Without Gothic Jill

by Luis S. González-Acevedo

Sea green bluish eyes…
piercing through the bedroom window
dazed by the sea of empty glass
penetrating the darkness of the cold night sky.

Sea green bluish eyes…
anxiously expectant
catching glimpses of gothic ghosts
wishing they were the sunrise amber of glowing embers.

Embers burning in midtown…
Slowly drowning in the haze enveloped swamps…
Drowning embers…
Taking with them these sea green bluish eyes
into the sea of broken glass
shattered by the cold, dark winter’s night.


–You can find the original poem in Caribbean Poet, by Luis S. González-Acevedo or a translated|modified version in Spanish in Poemas Caribeños, por Luis S. González-Acevedo–