Poem… The End

The End

(translation|modification of Final)

by Luis S. González-Acevedo

Solitary life of intense love
under abnegated shadows…
Subjugated in a frozen hell
that burns inwardly, never outwardly.

The wind turns air into a pink whirlwind
whose aged flower mocks its song.
Austere is slight’s venom,
murdering those intoxicated with passion.

Suffering tears run down his face,
competing and yearning for the heart.
These wretched celebrate their vile achievement,
injuring the vessel of an erotic emotion.

Behind the veil of a tropical cloud
and near the reach of its majestic touch,
an infernal silhouette appears
that with an erotic twist takes him to hell.

With her body over his, he injures himself,
abrading his skin with her naked touch.
Having her, he loses her and chastises his soul,
caressing her enchantments for the last time.


–You can find the poem in Caribbean Poet, by Luis S. González-Acevedo or the original version in Spanish in Poemas Caribeños, por Luis S. González-Acevedo–



 

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Poem… The Poet’s Destiny

The Poet’s Destiny

(translation|modification of Destino del Poeta)

by Luis S. González-Acevedo

Who will impose silence on a poet’s lips?
Who can go to war without weapons?
The words of a poet: beneficial arrows.
Villainous weapons: terrify the planet.

My rhymes water our cold human garden.
They are the sun’s tears. Impotent, the day breaks crying;
while in its obvious defiance, the tenebrous human night
covers its ears with severe winds to drown my song.

Poets die pronouncing eternal words.
Vicious time makes us suffer austere deaths.
It’s a curse that lasts a million serene nights;
but like Lazarus, every poet awaits the voice that proclaims: “Poet, come forth.”


–You can find the poem in Caribbean Poet, by Luis S. González-Acevedo or the original version in Spanish in Poemas Caribeños, por Luis S. González-Acevedo–



 

Poem… Snow & Flowers

Snow & Flowers

(translation|modification of Nieve y Flores)

by Luis S. González-Acevedo

Winter spreads its wool blanket,
covering gardens, skies and flowers.
To the wind, it spills chilled currents,
drowning the poor crying flowers.

Snowflakes fall,
covering each petal in bloom.
They become tears
and run to express their pain.

Flakes turn into droplets
and paint flowers.
The wind turns droplets back into flakes
and chills in the absence of heat.

Winter, bid farewell as spring returns
and the ice that confines flowers melts.
Remember, the liberated flowers will not cry
the snow’s estrangement and newfound intimacy with the sun.


–You can find the poem in Caribbean Poet, by Luis S. González-Acevedo or the original version in Spanish in Poemas Caribeños, por Luis S. González-Acevedo–




 

Poem… Death, Fall Upon My Tamed Face

Death, Fall Upon My Tamed Face

(translation|modification of Muerte, Cae Sobre Mi Domada Frente)

by Luis S. González-Acevedo

Death, fall upon my tamed face.
Bring night’s darkness to my eyes;
and while they can still open and close,
bring me to my knees.

Death, fall and destroy my unmoving heart,
whose irrational affection for another body
mocks its own placid passion
and feeds its ardent-sanguine-obstinate chi.

Silence my mortuary tears.
Proclaim for me an unstable life
that’s tortured by never-ending days
–a pernicious fortune badly suffered.

Take me on your weeping clouds
to the dark and gloomy world
without souls, without lives,
where the path to heaven is tenebrous.


–You can find the poem in Caribbean Poet, by Luis S. González-Acevedo or the original version in Spanish in Poemas Caribeños, por Luis S. González-Acevedo–



 

Poem | Cloud and Ink

beach calm clouds idyllic
Photo by Ibrahim Asad on Pexels.com

Original Version in Spanish | https://luissamuelgonzalezacevedo.com/2019/02/18/poema-nube-y-tinta/


Cloud and Ink

(translation of Nube y Tinta)

by Luis S. González-Acevedo

From heaven descended
a dove in search
of a man that would be
immortal and god.

He would take a heavenly cloud
as a pen
and before it dissipates
he would give it a tear.

Tear as ink and
with his hand paint
your face on the meadow and
your hair on the sea.


–You can enjoy the poem in Caribbean Poet, by Luis S. González-Acevedo or the original version in Spanish in Poemas Caribeños, por Luis. S. González-Acevedo