Poem… The Poet’s Destiny

The Poet’s Destiny

(translation|modification of Destino del Poeta)

by Luis S. González-Acevedo

Who will impose silence on a poet’s lips?
Who can go to war without weapons?
The words of a poet: beneficial arrows.
Villainous weapons: terrify the planet.

My rhymes water our cold human garden.
They are the sun’s tears. Impotent, the day breaks crying;
while in its obvious defiance, the tenebrous human night
covers its ears with severe winds to drown my song.

Poets die pronouncing eternal words.
Vicious time makes us suffer austere deaths.
It’s a curse that lasts a million serene nights;
but like Lazarus, every poet awaits the voice that proclaims: “Poet, come forth.”


–You can find the poem in Caribbean Poet, by Luis S. González-Acevedo or the original version in Spanish in Poemas Caribeños, por Luis S. González-Acevedo–



 

Poem… Colonial Century

Colonial Century

(translation|modification of Centenario Colonial)

by Luis S. González-Acevedo

We “celebrate” the colonial century
under American rule.
“They bring peace,” Don Mario says ironically.
If they bring peace, why are they armed?

Colonizers proclaimed “liberty”
and “offered” the most precious gifts.
Today, we suffer violence and vanity.
If they bring peace, why are they armed?

What happened to the jíbaros of yesteryear?
They were battered by the northwest’s colonizing winter.
The question all jíbaros & jíbaras should consider:
If they bring peace, why are they armed?


–You can find the poem in Caribbean Poet, by Luis S. González-Acevedo or the original version in Spanish in Poemas Caribeños, por Luis S. González-Acevedo–